7 Conversion Rate Optimization Myths You Should Stop Believing

7 Conversion Rate Optimization Myths You Should Stop Believing

Every business is always in the pursuit of improving the conversion rate on their website. There’s a lot of good advice on the internet on how to optimize the conversion rate, but there’s equally half-baked, ineffective information that can be deterrent to your conversion rate optimization (CRO) efforts.

In this article, we will debunk the 7 most commonly believed conversion rate optimization myths.

Myth #1: CRO Is All About A/B Testing

 

This of A/B testing as a part of the optimization process rather than the process itself.

 

This is arguably the most commonly believed myth about CRO, and I can understand where it comes from. Read any article that explains how to increase your conversions, and you’d be advised to run A/B tests to verify the validity of your assumptions. Therefore, A/B testing has become synonymous with conversion rate optimization.

While split testing is an integral part of CRO, there’s more to it than just A/B testing. CRO focuses on the interface, user experience, usability and persuasiveness of the website. And A/B testing is a methodology that helps marketers try out different elements to find the sweet spot. So, think of A/B testing as a part of the optimization process rather than the process itself.

Myth #2: CRO Is a Skill

 

Instead of looking at CRO as a skill, integrate it as a process that primarily comprises of copywriting, design and data analysis.

 

This myth probably came into existence because of organizations started hiring marketers for job designations such as “CRO Ninja” or “CRO Expert.” If you look at CRO as a discipline, you’d quickly realize that it’s not a skill; it’s rather a process.

To be a CRO expert, you need to be good at skills that modern marketers are often good at. Let’s look at each of them in brief:

  1. Copywriting: A CRO expert must be capable of writing copies that makes people fill out the form on the landing page or take out their wallet.
  2. Design: People are visual creatures. Having an eye for good design is a prerequisite for a CRO specialist. Therefore although the CRO expert may not be a designer in a conventional way, they should know what design trends are prevalent in the industry and what design aspects are proven to persuade people.
  3. Analysis: CRO is a data-driven process. To be good at CRO, you need to be able to infer meaningful insights from the available data.

Hence instead of looking at CRO as a skill, integrate it as a process that primarily comprises of copywriting, design and data analysis.

Myth #3: I Need More Visitors to Increase the Conversion Rate

 

Your aim with CRO should be to increase the conversion rate with the available traffic.

 

This myth is partially correct. You are playing the numbers game by driving more traffic to increase the conversion rate. But you’re essentially increasing the possibility, not ensuring it.

Let me explain it numerically. For instance, currently, you’re getting 10 conversions for 100 visits. You scale your visitors to 1000 and get 100 conversions. Now, even though your conversions have significantly gone up, the conversion rate has stayed the same, i.e., 10%.

Your aim with CRO should be to increase the conversion rate with the available traffic. If you are able to convert 12 visitors out of 100, then your CRO efforts have paid off. So, although driving more traffic to your website will always be helpful, it’s not an efficient CRO tactic.

Myth #4: I Just Need to Follow CRO Hacks to be Successful

 

Use CRO hacks as a way to kickstart your process and use data to guide your decisions.

 

It’d be preposterous for me to say something like this as I’ve written a few articles covering CRO hacks on this blog, but hear me out.

Oftentimes, tactics and hacks are presented as a way to help you get started in the right direction. Many marketers make the mistake of taking them as gospels.

Nothing is set in stone. There are various parameters that affect the conversion rate. Different audience, circumstances, niche or products require you to use different CRO tactics to get the best results.

As seen earlier, CRO is a process and heavily driven by data analysis. Therefore, use CRO hacks as a way to kickstart your process and use data to guide your decisions.

Myth #5: Small Changes Will Yield Big Results

 

Small changes will rarely yield significant results.

 

Organizations write case studies explaining how a tweak in the color of a call to action increased their conversion rate by umpteen times. I don’t dispute such case studies. It must have worked for them, but these tests are highly subjective.

The problem is when marketers take it as an inspiration and implement it without any hypothesis or assumption and get disheartened when they don’t see any results.

Always take such case studies with a grain of salt as what worked for them might not work for you. You need to find what works for you. If you get big results with tiny changes, then congrats, you just hit the jackpot!

But small changes will rarely yield significant results. If you’d like to see big results, you need to go big. Else you can focus on making small changes, and go for tiny continuous improvement, but it will simply take a lot of time.

Myth #6: More Lead Magnets Will Bring More Conversions

 

Keep in mind the “Less but better” philosophy.

 

Land on a website and you’d be hit with a barrage of lead magnets such as header bars, pop-ups, sliders and so on promoting content and different offers.

The mindset of showing more offers will increase the conversion rate often falls flat. The reason is, the paradox of choice is at play here. More choices don’t make the decision-making process easy, rather it complicates it. More is not better.

If you’d like to increase the conversion rate, give as few choices as possible. Don’t let your visitors sweat to make a choice. Keep in mind the “Less but better” philosophy.

Myth #7: Replicating a Competitor’s Website Will Increase My Conversion Rate

 

The best way is to look at their websites as an inspiration.

 

The obvious way for many organizations to get started with CRO is to look at the websites of their competitors and contemporaries and copy their style hoping to get the same results.

Even though you successfully replicate their design, you won’t be promised the same results because you’ll most likely be oblivious to their parallel marketing activities.

And the drawback of copying someone blindly is that you might accidentally copy the conversion faux pas hurting your CRO efforts in the process.

The best way is to look at their websites as an inspiration, cherry-pick the stuff and try things out.

Conclusion

Conversion rate optimization is a process that combines Art (Copywriting+Design) and Science (Data Analysis). The best way to approach CRO is to keep an open mind yet being wary of ineffective advice. If you are not sure, the best way to check the effectiveness of any assumption is to put it to test and verify its plausibility.

Do you have any questions related to conversion rate optimization? Do let us know in the comments below.

Editorial Staff

The editorial staff takes care of growth strategies, content creation, and outreach within the community for HumCommerce.

Add comment